Denise Partlow – InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services https://infocus.dellemc.com DELL EMC Global Services Blog Thu, 13 Dec 2018 11:38:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.7 Multi-cloud – What Does Good Look Like https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/multi-cloud-what-does-good-look-like/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/multi-cloud-what-does-good-look-like/#respond Mon, 22 Oct 2018 07:00:31 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=36545 Everyone seems to be doing something around cloud, and we often get questions from our customers wanting to know if their current state represents progress, or if they are behind their peers. So I thought I would jot down some of the observations that we’ve collected over the years about what a “good” cloud environment […]

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Everyone seems to be doing something around cloud, and we often get questions from our customers wanting to know if their current state represents progress, or if they are behind their peers. So I thought I would jot down some of the observations that we’ve collected over the years about what a “good” cloud environment looks like – what the architecture looks like, what the application portfolio will look like, how the IT organization will operate, and what metrics should be monitored. By the way, you can read about a recent analysis that IDG did of CIOs’ priorities and successes in this analysis of our transformation workshops. Some of the data in this blog comes from organizations who participated in these workshops.

In general, successful organizations 1) have built an infrastructure that securely connects and manages multiple cloud environments (public and/or private) using on-premises solutions, 2) deploy the right workload to the right cloud, and 3) have created a single operational model across clouds. They also 4) have a way to track and report metrics that prove the value of their investments.

What Does a Good Hybrid Cloud Architecture Look Like?

A hybrid cloud environment using VMware Cloud Foundation, vRealize, and NSX can enable you to seamlessly extend private clouds to public clouds as well as securely connect and manage multiple clouds with on-premises solutions. This type of architecture (see Figure 1) provides a way to run, manage, connect, and secure apps across clouds and devices in a common operating environment. It gives IT organizations choice and flexibility in how to build, run, and manage multiple private and public clouds. You can build and run applications on, and migrate them across, multiple clouds, securely connecting all clouds and managing all workloads across networks. Advanced operations management capabilities provide a unified view of the health, performance, and capacity management of workloads across clouds plus policy-based governance. It enables cloud brokering and integrating DevOps practices across multiple clouds. As needs change, it can provide an exit strategy for moving applications and workloads from the public cloud back on-prem.

Figure 1: Create a hybrid architecture for multi-cloud environments.

How Will Your Application Portfolio Change?

Speaking of an exit strategy, how can you minimize having to move an app? Another quality of a “good” multi-cloud environment is that applications reside on the most suitable infrastructure. The graphic in Figure 2 shows where our transformation customers expect changes to their app portfolio over the next 2-3 years. For most organizations today, very little of their portfolio is cloud-native. High performing organizations will get to around 20% within the next 2 years. Up to 10% will be in SaaS applications like CRM or collaboration and communication systems. There will be significant portions of the portfolio that will benefit from the agility and automation of infrastructure as a service, and can remain on-premises, but moved to a new more modern hardware platform, such as a private cloud or to converged and hyper-converged infrastructure. In 2020, “good” will look like up to 75% of the portfolio on new platforms.

Figure 2: How will the application portfolio change?

Additionally, most organizations will find that they can retire 20% of their portfolio. For companies who have been through an M&A, this can be as much as 50%. Application retirement can help archive and access the data while retiring an application and eliminate its associated costs for maintenance, licensing, and support. And lastly, depending on the industry, there will be some apps for which there is no cost benefit of moving to a new platform. These apps will remain in legacy infrastructure.

There’s a lot of value in taking a methodical approach to determining which applications belong on which platform. Use functional, technical, and business attributes for cloud selection with a consistent, repeatable framework for evaluation. Determine if you should migrate, modernize, retire, or simply leave an app as is. When we perform this service for customers, we will recommend a destination for each application that includes a relative cloud fit index describing how easily the application may be migrated there. We have a library of common targets, and we can also easily tailor the characteristics upon which we do the evaluation to customer-specific destinations, such as a custom private cloud or other modern infrastructure.

What Is the Value of a Multi-cloud IT Operating Model?

Changing the operating model is probably the most difficult part of transformation. Customers often ask where they will see cost savings if they do cloud right. Our experience is that you can reduce IT operational costs by roughly a quarter. It’s worth noting that these operational savings are not just from greater hardware and software efficiencies, as you can see by the large blue and the green sections on the graph in Figure 3. Those account for a relatively small portion of operating expenses. The greater savings come from more effective use of personnel and by leveraging automation and better tools to manage technology more efficiently. The key thing to remember is that it means working more closely with the business. It means an IT operating model that’s services and software product-oriented, not technology- or project-oriented.

Figure 3: The cost benefits of a multi-cloud transformation

What Are the Metrics of a Successful Multi-cloud Transformation?

Besides app disposition and operating model cost savings, what are some of the other metrics that result from a successful multi-cloud transformation? Take a look at Figure 4. Before we talk about the numbers, note that top performers have a strategy and roadmap that were agreed to by the top executives and business leaders of the organization. Read more in this blog series.

Figure 4: What does transformation look like?

Most metrics in Figure 4 are self-explanatory and you can read them at your leisure. But let’s point out a few key goals that you should be reaching for – time to provision infrastructure of less than one day and virtualization of 80-100% (depending on your industry and number of ‘retained’ legacy systems). Another key part of successful multi-cloud transformations is the use of network virtualization – up to 50%.

For applications, top performers are deploying new software in less than a week. They are also using PaaS and CaaS systems for up to 10% of their development activities. And they have 80% of apps protected with automated recovery.

The best performers also have a service catalog and an IT self-service portal in production.

In Closing

In summary, the graphic in Figure 5 highlights a few key best practices that we’ve learned working with clients on IT transformation programs around the world. Remember that a multi-cloud transformation is a tops down change agenda – successful projects have senior stakeholder involvement (e.g., CIO and CTO). And typically have a business case. These projects need to execute in multiple, concurrent workstreams in order to quickly show progress. A Transformation Program Office, or TPO, should be established to coordinate workstreams, as well as measure and report KPIs to show progress. IT infrastructure organizations cannot drive this process with a “build it and they will come” mentality. App owners from the business must be involved from the beginning.

Figure 5: What we’ve learned: IT transformation best practices.

If you want to see how your organization compares with successful multi-cloud environments, reach out to your Dell EMC representative.

See Related Blogs in the Series:

IT Transformation: CIO’s Priorities and Successes

4 Steps for a Successful Transition to Multi-cloud Model

 

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IT Transformation: CIO’s Priorities and Successes https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/cio-priorities-and-successes-it-transformation/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/cio-priorities-and-successes-it-transformation/#respond Mon, 10 Sep 2018 08:55:44 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=36068 IT transformation initiatives have been going on for over 10 years now and during that time, Dell EMC and VMware have executed hundreds of IT Transformation Workshops for organizations across the globe.  During these workshops, our consultants work with CIOs and their direct reports to evaluate their current state against their desired future state and […]

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IT transformation initiatives have been going on for over 10 years now and during that time, Dell EMC and VMware have executed hundreds of IT Transformation Workshops for organizations across the globe.  During these workshops, our consultants work with CIOs and their direct reports to evaluate their current state against their desired future state and to create prioritized activities that will help them close gaps in their IT transformation initiatives.  We take a look at all aspects of their transformation program – building infrastructure platforms, optimizing the application portfolio for the right infrastructure and cloud platform, and changing the IT operating model so that the IT organization works more closely with the business and with software developers.

These workshops analyze 30 areas of transformation and IDG recently performed an illuminating analysis of that data.  Note that these are not polled survey participants, but organizations who have asked Dell EMC Consulting and VMware to help them create and execute transformation programs.  The analysis reveals the answers to some key questions about the current state of IT transformation among real participants in transformation programs.  What progress has been made by top performers?  What are the top priorities?  Where are technological and operational challenges?  What does “good look like”?

What Progress Has Been Made by Top Performers?

One of the most important things that we tell our customers is that transformation is a tops-down agenda.  So it’s no surprise that top performers (those who have achieved the highest current state in the top 20% of all workshop participants) have enlisted full executive and line-of-business support for their IT transformation initiatives, and created a documented strategy and roadmap for that transformation.

Top performers also have made progress on implementing automation that’s required for IT as a service. They have nearly 100% of their infrastructure virtualized and can provision infrastructure in as little as 1 day.

What are the Top Priorities?

Year after year, building a self-service catalog and portal consistently ranks as the top priority over all others.  It is after all, the most visible way that the business experiences the effects of the automation and infrastructure efforts that IT organizations are executing.

But there are some interesting developments that organizations have started to undertake more recently.  Over the last three years, more companies (moving from 65% to 84%) want to use a hybrid cloud architecture to support multiple production apps across their environment.  Yet less than 10% have evaluated their application portfolio for hybrid cloud suitability.

DevOps and continuous deployment – a new topic recently added to the workshops – sprung to the top of the application priorities list.  67% want DevOps to be pervasive within their enterprise within the next 12-18 months, yet most take more than 6 months to get a new release deployed.  Clearly organizations are focusing their energies here as they work to meet these goals.

Network virtualization is another area that has increased in importance.  It is now where the most CIOs perceive they have the biggest gap in their infrastructure.  They want to be 40%, or more, virtualized within the next 12-18 months.

Where are Key Technological and Operational Challenges?

Through years of working with IT organizations, we’ve observed that changing the operating model is most often the hardest part of IT transformation.  Transforming service delivery, changing how infrastructure is deployed and managed, and reworking how the IT organization is structured are not simple tasks.  Not unexpectedly, the analysis shows these areas of the workshop are where CIOs consistently have the highest aspirations for target state.

We’ve seen dramatic interest in customers wanting to implement infrastructure as code (IaC) methodologies and processes to automatically managed and configure infrastructure.  So it’s no surprise that automated change and configuration management is ranked as a top priority by nearly 90% of the workshop participants, while only 5% said that they had achieved it.

Other areas where 85% or more of organizations want to improve the way they operate are being able to proactively address capacity and performance issues through alerting and automated responses, to have an automated transparent metering system in place, and to have an automated analytics engine in place which provides heuristics and trending information on all IT services.

Want to Hear More?

If you are having trouble with getting and sustaining momentum for a transformation initiative, you’ll want to check out this 3-part blog series on multi-cloud strategy.  The first one is Moving to Multi-Cloud: How to Get Stakeholders Aligned. Or try 4 Steps for a Successful Transition to a Multi-cloud Model.

Comment below with any comments or questions!

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4 Steps for a Successful Transition to a Multi-cloud Model https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/4-straightforward-steps-to-a-cloud-model/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/4-straightforward-steps-to-a-cloud-model/#respond Mon, 27 Aug 2018 09:00:46 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=35986 Moving to a multi-cloud model doesn’t happen overnight. But some organizations have more delays or false starts than others. There can be several reasons why progress may seem to be elusive. The one we see most frequently is trying to build a cloud environment without clearly defined objectives and without a plan (often using snowflakes). […]

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Moving to a multi-cloud model doesn’t happen overnight. But some organizations have more delays or false starts than others. There can be several reasons why progress may seem to be elusive. The one we see most frequently is trying to build a cloud environment without clearly defined objectives and without a plan (often using snowflakes). Dell EMC Consulting has prevented a lot of customers from making this mistake and helped them speed their deployments.

4 Steps for a Successful Transition to a Multi-cloud Model:

multi-cloud model

Figure 1: 4 steps for a successful transition to a multi-cloud model.

1Create a Roadmap and Business Case

Savvy CIOs want to enable business and application owners to quickly consume the new IT services provided by the cloud. Our successful customers define a set of outcomes and key performance indicators (KPIs) and create a series of rapid, functional releases, organized around delivering minimally viable products (MVPs) that simultaneously drive infrastructure, application, and operating model changes forward. See a sample best practice multi-cloud roadmap in Figure 2. When we build these for customers, we assess the current state, create a future-state vision, define the journey, create key metrics, and project the savings. The result is a business case with an ROI and roadmap (see Figure 2).

multi-cloud roadmap

Figure 2: Multi-cloud roadmap.

2Profile Applications

With a roadmap defined, your choice of cloud platform will be driven by your applications. To eliminate the possibility of an expensive mistake, you’ll want to quickly profile your applications to determine which ones should be modernized, migrated, retired, or simply left on their existing infrastructure. You’ll want to use a consistent, repeatable framework for evaluation, so that you can analyze apps in groups. See how this iterative process is executed in Figure 3.

At Dell EMC, we use a proprietary tool-based methodology that identifies and weights critical business priorities to provide an accurate view of the business importance of individual apps in the portfolio. This determines which applications to prioritize for cloud suitability. We use functional, technical, and business attributes for cloud selection. The recommended destinations for each application include a relative cloud fit index describing how easily the application may be migrated. Our tool has a library of common targets, and we can also easily tailor the evaluation characteristics to the customer’s specific destinations, such as a custom private cloud or other modern infrastructure. Based on this analysis, applications are prioritized into groups that are migrated to the new cloud or retired and archived, as shown in Figure 3.

multi-cloud application profile

Figure 3: Profile the application portfolio.

3 – Implement Cloud Management and Automation Platforms

While you’re profiling your applications, you’ll want to be building your private cloud platforms. We use VMware Cloud Foundation™, VMware vRealize® Suite, and VMware NSX®. Using these enables the seamless extension of private clouds to public clouds as well as enables you to securely connect and manage multiple on-premises cloud solutions, all in a common operating environment. As needs change, this architecture can provide an exit strategy for moving applications and workloads from the public cloud back on-premises.

4 – Transition to a Cloud Operating Model

Changing the operating model is probably the most difficult part of transformation. You need to create IT roles and processes for managing the lifecycle of your new, automated IT services and for working with the business to understand their needs. Don’t wait to design your roles and processes until after the infrastructure is in place. That will be too late. Define the essential processes and roles for a service-based organization, particularly for initial infrastructure as a service (IaaS) services, early.

If your cloud platform is also going to serve developers and support platform as a service (PaaS), start identifying those roles and processes early too. If one of your key metrics for your cloud is to release software product updates on a more frequent basis, then you will need to adopt DevOps principles. Some of the IT staff (application operations) will need to work as part of the software product team to create a continuous delivery pipeline to build, test, deploy, and promote cloud-based apps. See the functions of a multi-cloud operating model in Figure 4.

multi-cloud IT operating model

Figure 4: A Multi-cloud IT operating model.

In Closing

What are the next steps?

In addition to the links above, the new Dell EMC Cloud Marketplace is a great resource.

And when you’re ready to get started, reach out to your Dell EMC representative.

If you have any comments or question feel free to comment below.

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Take a giant leap forward when migrating Windows Server with application modernization https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/migrating-windows-server-infographic/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/migrating-windows-server-infographic/#respond Wed, 29 Mar 2017 09:00:47 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?post_type=emc_special_content&p=23025 Migration to a new Windows Server platform is only the first step in the modernization journey. It is difficult to find the time to make plans around migrating to a new Windows Server platform when your existing one is nearing end of life. Drive additional cost savings by taking a major leap forward, instead of […]

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Migration to a new Windows Server platform is only the first step in the modernization journey. It is difficult to find the time to make plans around migrating to a new Windows Server platform when your existing one is nearing end of life. Drive additional cost savings by taking a major leap forward, instead of simply focusing on the inconvenience of replatforming, and embracing a multifaceted modernization of your business.

View the infographic below to learn how Dell EMC can help you invest in the future and modernize your applications to reduce annual infrastructure and IT operations costs, stay on top of security updates, and move toward IT as a Service.

Dont-Just-Migrate-Windows-Server-Infographic

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Public, Private or Hybrid Cloud Conundrum – Infographic | Dell EMC https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/public-private-hybrid-cloud-application/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/public-private-hybrid-cloud-application/#respond Tue, 07 Mar 2017 10:00:56 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?post_type=emc_special_content&p=20907 Cloud architectures provide an abundance of benefits including cost savings, greater flexibility, and improved business agility. However, the greatest challenge for organizations making this leap is determining which of their applications to move to the cloud – and which cloud model, public, private or hybrid cloud, is best suited for each application. View the infographic […]

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Cloud architectures provide an abundance of benefits including cost savings, greater flexibility, and improved business agility. However, the greatest challenge for organizations making this leap is determining which of their applications to move to the cloud – and which cloud model, public, private or hybrid cloud, is best suited for each application.

View the infographic below to understand step-by-step how Dell EMC Application Profiling Services quickly analyze workloads for cloud suitability and recommend placement in the optimal public or private cloud models, based on specific requirements and business criteria.

Cloud

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80% of IT Execs are reporting improved productivity, quality, alignment and responsiveness with DevOps https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/application-delivery-capability-devops/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/application-delivery-capability-devops/#respond Thu, 23 Feb 2017 13:26:35 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?post_type=emc_special_content&p=22916 Having trouble delivering IT projects on-time and on-budget? As IT infrastructure advances, so does the challenge of integrating development, test, and operations organizations to deliver best results. View the infographic below to learn how you can get products to market quickly and more frequently with fewer risks and quality issues using DevOps.  If you are […]

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Having trouble delivering IT projects on-time and on-budget? As IT infrastructure advances, so does the challenge of integrating development, test, and operations organizations to deliver best results.

View the infographic below to learn how you can get products to market quickly and more frequently with fewer risks and quality issues using DevOps.  If you are thinking that you haven’t got time or resources to invest in these types of structural and communication changes, Dell EMC Services and Native Hybrid Cloud can help you experience these transformative results without taking your eye off of existing applications that your business needs.

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How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud? https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/determine-legacy-app-suitable-public-cloud/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/determine-legacy-app-suitable-public-cloud/#respond Tue, 26 Jul 2016 12:00:18 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=28420 In our recent analysis of the State of IT Transformation, 91% of the companies that we worked with admitted to having no organized, consistent means of evaluating applications for cloud.  There is a well-defined set of criteria that should be used to determine whether or not a legacy app is suitable for a public cloud […]

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In our recent analysis of the State of IT Transformation, 91% of the companies that we worked with admitted to having no organized, consistent means of evaluating applications for cloud.  There is a well-defined set of criteria that should be used to determine whether or not a legacy app is suitable for a public cloud platform.  Sometimes a single criterion can drive the decision; sometimes it’s a combination.  To determine which apps are suitable for a public cloud, you need to consider the technical architecture of your app, your business considerations, and your cost goals.  For discussion purposes, it’s probably easiest to identify criteria that make an app not suitable.What drives cloud sustainability

 

Let’s cover the technical characteristics first.

Network Latency
Is your app highly sensitive to latency? For example, is it real-time?  Does it require two-phase commit for database transactions?  Or can it tolerate some time lounging around while it waits for the network to get a message across.  Here’s an interesting little site (that works in lots of browsers) that shows how long it takes for your browser to ping each AWS region http://cloudping.mobilfactory.co.kr.  Run it a few times to see how variable latency can be and how it changes based on where you are.  When considering latency as a cloud-suitability criterion, be sure you understand how it might affect your SLAs and what your cloud provider can guarantee, and at what price.

I/O
Does your app have high, sustained I/O rates? It probably will run in a public cloud, but how expensive will that be?  You can read and write all you want in your own private cloud and no one is going to charge you a cent extra.  But you might want to take a look at your app’s disk stats over several time periods to really understand it, and then see where your potential public cloud provider starts charging extra.

Integration
How often does it interact with other systems or apps? Where are those systems located? How many systems or data sources are in play?  Locations and frequency of interactions between the app and external systems will affect the complexity of moving your app.  If you have more than 5 data sources and/or legacy apps to integrate with, it’s not going to be a simple exercise to put this app in a public cloud because you might just introduce latency problems where there weren’t any before.

Now let’s talk about some of the business considerations.

SLAs
Applications in today’s customer-facing, highly competitive marketplace will likely require consistent and guaranteed performance and availability levels. If you consider that a typical public cloud provider offers 99.95% availability, you may be placing your application in jeopardy.  While complete system downtime is rare, your app could be down because one or more services that your app uses are down.  If the service level falls below 99.95%, what do you get, besides unhappy users, employees, or customers, and potentially lost business or data?  Service credits.  And of course you have to submit a claim, with documents and logs that show the downtime, to ask for the credit – you are not going to automatically receive a billing credit just because you said something was down.  You will have to prove it.  If your business cannot take downtime on the app you are thinking of moving to the cloud, it’s probably not a good fit.  Also consider if require formal, documented monitoring of service levels for your app.

Disaster Recovery
Closely related to SLAs is disaster recovery. If there is downtime, how does it affect your business?  How long can your app stay down before you have a serious business or regulatory compliance impact?  How much data loss can you take?  If your business is ok with the app being down for 4 hours and/or you can operate with a 4-hour data loss, then a public cloud may be suitable.  If you need zero data loss and <1 hour RTO, then you will probably not want to pay what the public cloud provider wants to guarantee that.  But suppose you did contract for that, and there was a failure under that agreement, what damages can your business recover? Service credits.

Data Confidentiality and Regulatory Compliance (Security)
Data confidentiality and regulatory compliance requirements will vary by industry and country. Be sure you understand exactly how the vendor meets your particular security requirements.  Note that if your app processes Personally Identifiable Information (PII), or Sensitive Personal Information (SPI), as used in US privacy law, a public cloud provider will need to have ISO 27018 certification.

One last thing – are you going to write a new app? Planning to use the unique services/APIs and data stores that the cloud provider offers?  Make sure you do that knowing that you could be locking yourself in forever to that vendor, and some vendors make it extremely difficult to migrate out of their environment.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

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IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90% https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/execs-plan-reduce-software-development-release-cycle-times-75-90/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/execs-plan-reduce-software-development-release-cycle-times-75-90/#respond Wed, 25 May 2016 09:00:29 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=27570 Part 5 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation In our State of IT Transformation analysis, nearly 70% of participants said that they take at least 6-12 months, and often more, to get a software release into production, and that they wanted that to be in the range of 2 weeks to 3 […]

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Part 5 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation

In our State of IT Transformation analysis, nearly 70% of participants said that they take at least 6-12 months, and often more, to get a software release into production, and that they wanted that to be in the range of 2 weeks to 3 months. Is that achievable?

Well, according to McKinsey in “Beyond agile: Reorganizing IT for faster software delivery,” companies can reduce the average number of days between code development and live production from 89 days to 15 days, a mere 17% of the original time, by better integrating software development processes with IT operations. So, it sounds reasonable enough, but how do you do that?

Even setting a simple goal, like “deploy into production every 30 days,” is going to affect software development, testing, operations, infrastructure management, databases, security, compliance, architecture, release management, project management, and more. You’ll need integrated tooling and a strong API-driven architecture to streamline end-to-end automation like this.

Which leads us to another key point from our State of IT Transformation analysis. 82% of participants said that they did not have a scalable, infrastructure-independent application framework on which to build mobile-friendly, cloud-native apps. So, organizations are lacking processes and platforms and tool chains.

state1

How then can you change how you ultimately budget, plan, manage, execute, and organize your software development lifecycle to speed it up? You’ve probably been doing it the same way for a long time, especially if you’re maintaining a business critical app that you’ve had for awhile. But even if you want to retool processes for a new project, let’s say for a new mobile app that taps into that business critical app. How will you do that? Try DevOps. You can learn about DevOps for free with the EMC DevOps MOOC.

In EMC Global Services, we help teams get started with DevOps in a way that can eventually scale across the organization. We pair with customer team members to not only build a continuous delivery tool chain but also to begin to model DevOps practices and process. This enables us to seed a DevOps culture while helping to navigate around common roadblocks and pitfalls. We “Align -> Radiate -> Scale.”

state2

This approach starts with aligning key stakeholders around a common desired state and a shared understanding of current readiness. As a roadmap begins to take shape, we work to prove out continuous delivery and build local champions that will help radiate the solutions. Once proven, we work together to design and develop repeatable processes and patterns for onboarding other applications and divisions. Succinctly, our process for building DevOps so that it can be scaled out, is:

  1. Align
    • Define the desired state
    • Organize around common values and goals
    • Focus on deployment
  2. Prove
    • Develop an MVP (minimally viable product), then iterate
    • Seed a lean, collaborative culture
    • Define a target and measure progress towards the goal
    • If possible, pair with an active development project
  3. Radiate
    • Build with the intent to scale
    • Continue to iterate

My next blog post will make some predictions about where investments are going to be made, based on the priorities set by CIOs in our IT Transformation Workshops.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

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State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-solving-operating-model-challenge/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-solving-operating-model-challenge/#respond Tue, 12 Apr 2016 12:28:40 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=26869 Part 4 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation We are continuing to hear that operating model is the most challenging part of IT transformation. Technology implementation is the easy part. The hard part is changing how you operate to take full advantage of it. In our State of IT Transformation analysis, 95% […]

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Part 4 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation

We are continuing to hear that operating model is the most challenging part of IT transformation. Technology implementation is the easy part. The hard part is changing how you operate to take full advantage of it. In our State of IT Transformation analysis, 95% said they want to have an IT organization that has no silos and works together to deliver business-focused services at the lowest cost. 88% think they need to improve skills in both cloud technology and business-facing service definition.

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McKinsey says that if an organization can introduce a new model for demand and service management, it can usually realize 10 to 20% cost savings (“Managing the demand for IT infrastructure” by McKinsey & Company).

Gartner analyst Tom Bittman said that failure to change the operational model was the biggest stumbling block to successful cloud implementation (“Why Are Private Clouds Failing?” by Thomas Bittman, Gartner Blog Network).

Let’s say you’ve just implemented a VCE Vblock System and you’ve automated processes for provisioning test/dev environments.  How do you realize the cost savings of implementing cloud automation technologies that McKinsey promises and eliminate the stumbling blocks that Gartner is hearing about?

You begin to transition your IT organization to manage the full service lifecycle for these new services, to focus on the broader end-to-end picture of how IT services will be delivered, rather than on silo’d technology stacks. You create an IT Service Center for infrastructure as a service (IaaS). An IT Service Center is built on the ITIL framework for IT Service Management. It allows IT to manage the full service lifecycle for a defined set of services, from service strategy, to service design, to service transition, to service operation.

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The first step is to assess the current operating environment, both processes and organization. The charter, or the focus of the service center, and type of services that will be provided for a single service center is defined. In this example, we are starting with IaaS services – compute services, storage services, and networking services.

A best practice for assessing processes is to start by identifying gaps between your current state and desired state for the key ITIL processes (we have a recommended subset of 15) in the ITIL Process Maturity Framework. Once gaps are identified, process improvements are defined to close those gaps. Automation tools are implemented where needed.

With these new processes, you’ll want to take a look at the current IT organizational structure, roles, and skills. New and/or changed roles and responsibilities will be required. Your IT staff will be managing services now, not just technology components. You’ll have roles like portfolio manager, solutions architect, and service operations manager.

To summarize, the IT Service Center transforms how the IT organization works and thinks. Processes, roles, and skills, as well as organization alignment, are redefined so that IT can work better with the business to determine what they need and deliver the right mix of services. This service provider mindset allows IT to be more strategic towards business outcomes, and to create value for the business. Read how EMC consultants did it for EMC IT.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

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State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-cios-want-automation/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-cios-want-automation/#respond Tue, 29 Mar 2016 12:00:45 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=26774 Part 3 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation If you read my last two blogs, you know that EMC and VMware have been doing workshops on IT transformation with CIOs for several years now and that we recently analyzed the data collected during these workshops in our State of IT Transformation analysis. […]

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Part 3 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation

If you read my last two blogs, you know that EMC and VMware have been doing workshops on IT transformation with CIOs for several years now and that we recently analyzed the data collected during these workshops in our State of IT Transformation analysis. 80% of the participants indicated they want to standardize services in a business-focused catalog and to increase automation to improve IT service delivery including:

  • Resource Provisioning – 77% of participants expressed the desire to provision infrastructure resources in less than a day by 2016-2017, or dynamically as needed; over half reported they currently take one to four weeks to do so
  • Financial Management – 87% said they rely on a yearly allocation-based recovery, or a project-by-project recovery of IT costs; only 5% said they are able to bill the business for services consumed at an advertised price

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How do you get to a state where you can dynamically provision infrastructure resources? Automation of course. The CIOs in our analysis view cloud technologies as a key enabler for them to provide the automation and self-service that will reduce operating costs. 70% want to standardize on a hybrid cloud architecture across the organization in the 2016-2017 timeframe with over 90% of companies currently in the evaluation or proof of concept stage. Once you have the platform in place, you can easily provision infrastructure, and then it’s relatively straightforward to add new internal or external services such as PaaS or SaaS. Ever thought about jump-starting these things with a pre-engineered solution? According to Principled Technologies, it’s 92% faster, about 1½ months vs. 1½ years, to buy vs. build.

CIOs-Want-Hybrid-Cloud_snackable

This leads us to another key area where CIOs want to improve – charging a fair price for the services in their catalog. So, how do you determine the total cost of your service so that you can create a fair price for it? Total cost of a service is based on its component costs and projected utilization.

A service’s component costs are computed by aligning physical assets with IT financial data. To determine the physical assets, start with your service catalog. The catalog contains the service reference architecture, which identifies all the physical assets needed to deliver the service. This includes hardware, software, networking, facilities, personnel, external services, and overhead assets. Then collect the IT financial data such as cost, depreciation, end of life, etc., for the physical assets.

To determine projected utilization, put the performance data of your existing monitoring systems in a database. Use reporting tools to analyze historical trends and determine projected service utilization as well actual utilization.

Once component costs and projected utilization are determined, that information can be input into a cost model to determine service total cost of ownership (TCO). Read more about how EMC does IT financial management.

Once you know your costs, you can determine what price you want to charge the business. Service pricing involves evaluating the service TCO against specific IT financial objectives and funding policies. For example, services can be priced to recover IT costs, or to make internal services cost-competitive with external services. They can be priced to provide funding for internal projects or capital improvements. Or they could be priced to make a profit.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

The post State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation appeared first on InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services.

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