Denise Partlow – InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services https://infocus.dellemc.com DELL EMC Global Services Blog Tue, 07 Aug 2018 19:04:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.7 Take a giant leap forward when migrating Windows Server with application modernization https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/migrating-windows-server-infographic/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/migrating-windows-server-infographic/#respond Wed, 29 Mar 2017 09:00:47 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?post_type=emc_special_content&p=23025 Migration to a new Windows Server platform is only the first step in the modernization journey. It is difficult to find the time to make plans around migrating to a new Windows Server platform when your existing one is nearing end of life. Drive additional cost savings by taking a major leap forward, instead of […]

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Migration to a new Windows Server platform is only the first step in the modernization journey. It is difficult to find the time to make plans around migrating to a new Windows Server platform when your existing one is nearing end of life. Drive additional cost savings by taking a major leap forward, instead of simply focusing on the inconvenience of replatforming, and embracing a multifaceted modernization of your business.

View the infographic below to learn how Dell EMC can help you invest in the future and modernize your applications to reduce annual infrastructure and IT operations costs, stay on top of security updates, and move toward IT as a Service.

Dont-Just-Migrate-Windows-Server-Infographic

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Public, Private or Hybrid Cloud Conundrum – Infographic | Dell EMC https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/public-private-hybrid-cloud-application/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/public-private-hybrid-cloud-application/#respond Tue, 07 Mar 2017 10:00:56 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?post_type=emc_special_content&p=20907 Cloud architectures provide an abundance of benefits including cost savings, greater flexibility, and improved business agility. However, the greatest challenge for organizations making this leap is determining which of their applications to move to the cloud – and which cloud model, public, private or hybrid cloud, is best suited for each application. View the infographic […]

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Cloud architectures provide an abundance of benefits including cost savings, greater flexibility, and improved business agility. However, the greatest challenge for organizations making this leap is determining which of their applications to move to the cloud – and which cloud model, public, private or hybrid cloud, is best suited for each application.

View the infographic below to understand step-by-step how Dell EMC Application Profiling Services quickly analyze workloads for cloud suitability and recommend placement in the optimal public or private cloud models, based on specific requirements and business criteria.

Cloud

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80% of IT Execs are reporting improved productivity, quality, alignment and responsiveness with DevOps https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/application-delivery-capability-devops/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/application-delivery-capability-devops/#respond Thu, 23 Feb 2017 13:26:35 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?post_type=emc_special_content&p=22916 Having trouble delivering IT projects on-time and on-budget? As IT infrastructure advances, so does the challenge of integrating development, test, and operations organizations to deliver best results. View the infographic below to learn how you can get products to market quickly and more frequently with fewer risks and quality issues using DevOps.  If you are […]

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Having trouble delivering IT projects on-time and on-budget? As IT infrastructure advances, so does the challenge of integrating development, test, and operations organizations to deliver best results.

View the infographic below to learn how you can get products to market quickly and more frequently with fewer risks and quality issues using DevOps.  If you are thinking that you haven’t got time or resources to invest in these types of structural and communication changes, Dell EMC Services and Native Hybrid Cloud can help you experience these transformative results without taking your eye off of existing applications that your business needs.

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How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud? https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/determine-legacy-app-suitable-public-cloud/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/determine-legacy-app-suitable-public-cloud/#respond Tue, 26 Jul 2016 12:00:18 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=28420 In our recent analysis of the State of IT Transformation, 91% of the companies that we worked with admitted to having no organized, consistent means of evaluating applications for cloud.  There is a well-defined set of criteria that should be used to determine whether or not a legacy app is suitable for a public cloud […]

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In our recent analysis of the State of IT Transformation, 91% of the companies that we worked with admitted to having no organized, consistent means of evaluating applications for cloud.  There is a well-defined set of criteria that should be used to determine whether or not a legacy app is suitable for a public cloud platform.  Sometimes a single criterion can drive the decision; sometimes it’s a combination.  To determine which apps are suitable for a public cloud, you need to consider the technical architecture of your app, your business considerations, and your cost goals.  For discussion purposes, it’s probably easiest to identify criteria that make an app not suitable.What drives cloud sustainability

 

Let’s cover the technical characteristics first.

Network Latency
Is your app highly sensitive to latency? For example, is it real-time?  Does it require two-phase commit for database transactions?  Or can it tolerate some time lounging around while it waits for the network to get a message across.  Here’s an interesting little site (that works in lots of browsers) that shows how long it takes for your browser to ping each AWS region http://cloudping.mobilfactory.co.kr.  Run it a few times to see how variable latency can be and how it changes based on where you are.  When considering latency as a cloud-suitability criterion, be sure you understand how it might affect your SLAs and what your cloud provider can guarantee, and at what price.

I/O
Does your app have high, sustained I/O rates? It probably will run in a public cloud, but how expensive will that be?  You can read and write all you want in your own private cloud and no one is going to charge you a cent extra.  But you might want to take a look at your app’s disk stats over several time periods to really understand it, and then see where your potential public cloud provider starts charging extra.

Integration
How often does it interact with other systems or apps? Where are those systems located? How many systems or data sources are in play?  Locations and frequency of interactions between the app and external systems will affect the complexity of moving your app.  If you have more than 5 data sources and/or legacy apps to integrate with, it’s not going to be a simple exercise to put this app in a public cloud because you might just introduce latency problems where there weren’t any before.

Now let’s talk about some of the business considerations.

SLAs
Applications in today’s customer-facing, highly competitive marketplace will likely require consistent and guaranteed performance and availability levels. If you consider that a typical public cloud provider offers 99.95% availability, you may be placing your application in jeopardy.  While complete system downtime is rare, your app could be down because one or more services that your app uses are down.  If the service level falls below 99.95%, what do you get, besides unhappy users, employees, or customers, and potentially lost business or data?  Service credits.  And of course you have to submit a claim, with documents and logs that show the downtime, to ask for the credit – you are not going to automatically receive a billing credit just because you said something was down.  You will have to prove it.  If your business cannot take downtime on the app you are thinking of moving to the cloud, it’s probably not a good fit.  Also consider if require formal, documented monitoring of service levels for your app.

Disaster Recovery
Closely related to SLAs is disaster recovery. If there is downtime, how does it affect your business?  How long can your app stay down before you have a serious business or regulatory compliance impact?  How much data loss can you take?  If your business is ok with the app being down for 4 hours and/or you can operate with a 4-hour data loss, then a public cloud may be suitable.  If you need zero data loss and <1 hour RTO, then you will probably not want to pay what the public cloud provider wants to guarantee that.  But suppose you did contract for that, and there was a failure under that agreement, what damages can your business recover? Service credits.

Data Confidentiality and Regulatory Compliance (Security)
Data confidentiality and regulatory compliance requirements will vary by industry and country. Be sure you understand exactly how the vendor meets your particular security requirements.  Note that if your app processes Personally Identifiable Information (PII), or Sensitive Personal Information (SPI), as used in US privacy law, a public cloud provider will need to have ISO 27018 certification.

One last thing – are you going to write a new app? Planning to use the unique services/APIs and data stores that the cloud provider offers?  Make sure you do that knowing that you could be locking yourself in forever to that vendor, and some vendors make it extremely difficult to migrate out of their environment.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

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IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90% https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/execs-plan-reduce-software-development-release-cycle-times-75-90/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/execs-plan-reduce-software-development-release-cycle-times-75-90/#respond Wed, 25 May 2016 09:00:29 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=27570 Part 5 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation In our State of IT Transformation analysis, nearly 70% of participants said that they take at least 6-12 months, and often more, to get a software release into production, and that they wanted that to be in the range of 2 weeks to 3 […]

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Part 5 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation

In our State of IT Transformation analysis, nearly 70% of participants said that they take at least 6-12 months, and often more, to get a software release into production, and that they wanted that to be in the range of 2 weeks to 3 months. Is that achievable?

Well, according to McKinsey in “Beyond agile: Reorganizing IT for faster software delivery,” companies can reduce the average number of days between code development and live production from 89 days to 15 days, a mere 17% of the original time, by better integrating software development processes with IT operations. So, it sounds reasonable enough, but how do you do that?

Even setting a simple goal, like “deploy into production every 30 days,” is going to affect software development, testing, operations, infrastructure management, databases, security, compliance, architecture, release management, project management, and more. You’ll need integrated tooling and a strong API-driven architecture to streamline end-to-end automation like this.

Which leads us to another key point from our State of IT Transformation analysis. 82% of participants said that they did not have a scalable, infrastructure-independent application framework on which to build mobile-friendly, cloud-native apps. So, organizations are lacking processes and platforms and tool chains.

state1

How then can you change how you ultimately budget, plan, manage, execute, and organize your software development lifecycle to speed it up? You’ve probably been doing it the same way for a long time, especially if you’re maintaining a business critical app that you’ve had for awhile. But even if you want to retool processes for a new project, let’s say for a new mobile app that taps into that business critical app. How will you do that? Try DevOps. You can learn about DevOps for free with the EMC DevOps MOOC.

In EMC Global Services, we help teams get started with DevOps in a way that can eventually scale across the organization. We pair with customer team members to not only build a continuous delivery tool chain but also to begin to model DevOps practices and process. This enables us to seed a DevOps culture while helping to navigate around common roadblocks and pitfalls. We “Align -> Radiate -> Scale.”

state2

This approach starts with aligning key stakeholders around a common desired state and a shared understanding of current readiness. As a roadmap begins to take shape, we work to prove out continuous delivery and build local champions that will help radiate the solutions. Once proven, we work together to design and develop repeatable processes and patterns for onboarding other applications and divisions. Succinctly, our process for building DevOps so that it can be scaled out, is:

  1. Align
    • Define the desired state
    • Organize around common values and goals
    • Focus on deployment
  2. Prove
    • Develop an MVP (minimally viable product), then iterate
    • Seed a lean, collaborative culture
    • Define a target and measure progress towards the goal
    • If possible, pair with an active development project
  3. Radiate
    • Build with the intent to scale
    • Continue to iterate

My next blog post will make some predictions about where investments are going to be made, based on the priorities set by CIOs in our IT Transformation Workshops.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

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State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-solving-operating-model-challenge/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-solving-operating-model-challenge/#respond Tue, 12 Apr 2016 12:28:40 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=26869 Part 4 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation We are continuing to hear that operating model is the most challenging part of IT transformation. Technology implementation is the easy part. The hard part is changing how you operate to take full advantage of it. In our State of IT Transformation analysis, 95% […]

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Part 4 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation

We are continuing to hear that operating model is the most challenging part of IT transformation. Technology implementation is the easy part. The hard part is changing how you operate to take full advantage of it. In our State of IT Transformation analysis, 95% said they want to have an IT organization that has no silos and works together to deliver business-focused services at the lowest cost. 88% think they need to improve skills in both cloud technology and business-facing service definition.

StateofIT_Part4_1

McKinsey says that if an organization can introduce a new model for demand and service management, it can usually realize 10 to 20% cost savings (“Managing the demand for IT infrastructure” by McKinsey & Company).

Gartner analyst Tom Bittman said that failure to change the operational model was the biggest stumbling block to successful cloud implementation (“Why Are Private Clouds Failing?” by Thomas Bittman, Gartner Blog Network).

Let’s say you’ve just implemented a VCE Vblock System and you’ve automated processes for provisioning test/dev environments.  How do you realize the cost savings of implementing cloud automation technologies that McKinsey promises and eliminate the stumbling blocks that Gartner is hearing about?

You begin to transition your IT organization to manage the full service lifecycle for these new services, to focus on the broader end-to-end picture of how IT services will be delivered, rather than on silo’d technology stacks. You create an IT Service Center for infrastructure as a service (IaaS). An IT Service Center is built on the ITIL framework for IT Service Management. It allows IT to manage the full service lifecycle for a defined set of services, from service strategy, to service design, to service transition, to service operation.

StateofIT_Part4_2.jpg

The first step is to assess the current operating environment, both processes and organization. The charter, or the focus of the service center, and type of services that will be provided for a single service center is defined. In this example, we are starting with IaaS services – compute services, storage services, and networking services.

A best practice for assessing processes is to start by identifying gaps between your current state and desired state for the key ITIL processes (we have a recommended subset of 15) in the ITIL Process Maturity Framework. Once gaps are identified, process improvements are defined to close those gaps. Automation tools are implemented where needed.

With these new processes, you’ll want to take a look at the current IT organizational structure, roles, and skills. New and/or changed roles and responsibilities will be required. Your IT staff will be managing services now, not just technology components. You’ll have roles like portfolio manager, solutions architect, and service operations manager.

To summarize, the IT Service Center transforms how the IT organization works and thinks. Processes, roles, and skills, as well as organization alignment, are redefined so that IT can work better with the business to determine what they need and deliver the right mix of services. This service provider mindset allows IT to be more strategic towards business outcomes, and to create value for the business. Read how EMC consultants did it for EMC IT.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

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State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-cios-want-automation/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/state-transformation-cios-want-automation/#respond Tue, 29 Mar 2016 12:00:45 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=26774 Part 3 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation If you read my last two blogs, you know that EMC and VMware have been doing workshops on IT transformation with CIOs for several years now and that we recently analyzed the data collected during these workshops in our State of IT Transformation analysis. […]

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Part 3 in our global study of gaps in IT transformation

If you read my last two blogs, you know that EMC and VMware have been doing workshops on IT transformation with CIOs for several years now and that we recently analyzed the data collected during these workshops in our State of IT Transformation analysis. 80% of the participants indicated they want to standardize services in a business-focused catalog and to increase automation to improve IT service delivery including:

  • Resource Provisioning – 77% of participants expressed the desire to provision infrastructure resources in less than a day by 2016-2017, or dynamically as needed; over half reported they currently take one to four weeks to do so
  • Financial Management – 87% said they rely on a yearly allocation-based recovery, or a project-by-project recovery of IT costs; only 5% said they are able to bill the business for services consumed at an advertised price

CIOs-Catalog-Provisioning

How do you get to a state where you can dynamically provision infrastructure resources? Automation of course. The CIOs in our analysis view cloud technologies as a key enabler for them to provide the automation and self-service that will reduce operating costs. 70% want to standardize on a hybrid cloud architecture across the organization in the 2016-2017 timeframe with over 90% of companies currently in the evaluation or proof of concept stage. Once you have the platform in place, you can easily provision infrastructure, and then it’s relatively straightforward to add new internal or external services such as PaaS or SaaS. Ever thought about jump-starting these things with a pre-engineered solution? According to Principled Technologies, it’s 92% faster, about 1½ months vs. 1½ years, to buy vs. build.

CIOs-Want-Hybrid-Cloud_snackable

This leads us to another key area where CIOs want to improve – charging a fair price for the services in their catalog. So, how do you determine the total cost of your service so that you can create a fair price for it? Total cost of a service is based on its component costs and projected utilization.

A service’s component costs are computed by aligning physical assets with IT financial data. To determine the physical assets, start with your service catalog. The catalog contains the service reference architecture, which identifies all the physical assets needed to deliver the service. This includes hardware, software, networking, facilities, personnel, external services, and overhead assets. Then collect the IT financial data such as cost, depreciation, end of life, etc., for the physical assets.

To determine projected utilization, put the performance data of your existing monitoring systems in a database. Use reporting tools to analyze historical trends and determine projected service utilization as well actual utilization.

Once component costs and projected utilization are determined, that information can be input into a cost model to determine service total cost of ownership (TCO). Read more about how EMC does IT financial management.

Once you know your costs, you can determine what price you want to charge the business. Service pricing involves evaluating the service TCO against specific IT financial objectives and funding policies. For example, services can be priced to recover IT costs, or to make internal services cost-competitive with external services. They can be priced to provide funding for internal projects or capital improvements. Or they could be priced to make a profit.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

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IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/service-strategy-catalogs-portals/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/service-strategy-catalogs-portals/#comments Tue, 22 Mar 2016 12:00:43 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=26714 Part 2 in our global analysis of IT transformation IT organizations are experiencing a cultural revolution. CIOs want to run IT like a customer-focused business. They want to empower users with self-service and enable them to make value-based consumption decisions. This means packaging IT services for easy consumption by the business, providing financial transparency through […]

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Part 2 in our global analysis of IT transformation

IT organizations are experiencing a cultural revolution. CIOs want to run IT like a customer-focused business. They want to empower users with self-service and enable them to make value-based consumption decisions. This means packaging IT services for easy consumption by the business, providing financial transparency through unit-based pricing and billing, and developing processes, roles, and skills to successfully manage the supply and demand side of the portfolio.

As I mentioned in my last blog, EMC and VMware have been doing workshops on IT transformation with our customers for several years now. We recently analyzed the data collected during these workshops. The top gap, identified by all organizations, is their ability to provide and efficiently manage user requests through a service catalog and self-service portal. 80% plan to have a self-service portal and service catalog in place by the 2016-2017 timeframe.

ITTW picture

What’s the best way to do that? We recommend you begin with a few impactful services – perhaps test/dev provisioning for programmers with a couple for business users and IT. Document those services in clear, easy-to-understand language. After that, put in place an iterative process to define additional services and refine the existing ones.

Here’s the 8-week process that we recommend to build a service catalog.

  1. Start by analyzing any existing service catalog, the service management processes, and governance of the services. Do this with both IT management and the business.
  2. Create an organizing services hierarchy and taxonomy for defining and describing services.
  3. Identify the most impactful services. Then develop an initial service catalog for those services. This would include detailed service definitions and a blueprint solution architecture that includes service request processes and the decision logic for mapping service tiers to supporting technology.
  4. Based on the findings from analyzing the current governance process, develop service center charters to define service development mission and vision and the scope of services to be developed.
  5. Create a roadmap for achieving a comprehensive future state service catalog and a self-service portal that the business can use to access the services.

When it comes to a portal, we see many people who are concerned that without a mature service catalog a portal serves no purpose. One of the great benefits of a portal is that you can gain value from creating one regardless of where you are on your journey to ITaaS.

You can accomplish a great deal just by creating a storefront. By making information available about services you provide today (even if they are manually delivered), you can avoid some of the “can you do” questions. To most business users of services, IT is a black box and a mystery. Providing information is a good first step even if you are not ready to automate a lot of your processes.

Here’s an analogy. Think of the early days of eCommerce. Websites were facades only to mask manual processes. The value was that it provided an easy way for customers to shop and order products whenever they wanted to, without knowing that everything behind the website was actually fulfilled manually. Of course, like the early eCommerce vendors, you want to be thinking about how to automate at least the most critical services so you can react more quickly and be more responsive, but you can get a lot of value by creating that storefront for the business while you automate.

Continue Reading the Series:

Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
Are You An IT Service Fast Food Junkie?

 

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Best Places to Start in IT Transformation – What CIOs Are Telling Us https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/best-places-start-transformation-cios-telling-us/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/best-places-start-transformation-cios-telling-us/#comments Tue, 15 Mar 2016 10:05:05 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=26476 Part 1 in our global analysis of IT transformation To create the IT organization that will support a modern, digital business, IT organizations are examining their infrastructure, operating model, and applications. EMC announced the results of a global analysis that we did of companies who are striving to create just that type of IT organization.  […]

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Part 1 in our global analysis of IT transformation

To create the IT organization that will support a modern, digital business, IT organizations are examining their infrastructure, operating model, and applications. EMC announced the results of a global analysis that we did of companies who are striving to create just that type of IT organization.  The analysis comes from over 660 organizations who specifically engaged us to help them assess their gaps, benchmark them against their competition, and prioritize actions they can take to close those gaps.  It is not a random sample of research subjects, but an analysis of companies who are actually in the midst of an IT transformation. CIOs and their direct reports are the attendees of these workshops.

3-Areas_Piece

Let’s take a look at that some of this data in 2 areas – infrastructure and operating model.

Infrastructure – CIOs want a hybrid cloud for automation and self-service to reduce operating costs.

Organizations who are making the most progress toward their digital business objectives are also the most enthusiastic hybrid cloud adopters.  Hence, it’s no surprise that defining a hybrid cloud platform is a top area where companies want to improve.  Over 90% of companies who participated in our workshops were in the evaluation or proof of concept stage in having a well-engineered hybrid cloud architecture.  Yet, 91% of IT organizations have no organized, consistent means of evaluating workloads for hybrid cloud.  A mere 3% have evaluated their application portfolio with the business, evaluating suitability for hybrid cloud delivery with respect to business processes and sensitivity of data.  Without a consistent process, evaluations are done ad hoc for just a few apps, are time consuming, and are difficult to repeat.  This can impede the standardization and adoption of hybrid cloud across the enterprise.

CIOs-Want-Hybrid-Cloud_Piece

Operating Model – CIOs want to run IT like a customer-focused business.

The area where organizations want to improve most is in their operating model and service strategy.  95% are striving to have an IT organization that has no silos and works together to deliver business-focused services at the lowest cost.

CIOs-Want-to-Run-IT_Piece

They want to empower users with self-service and portals that will allow them to make value-based consumption decisions.  This means packaging IT services for easy consumption by the business, providing financial transparency through unit-based pricing and billing, and developing processes, roles, and skills to successfully manage the supply and demand side of the portfolio.

In my next blog, I’ll share some really interesting data points about where many organizations are in individual areas like an IT service catalog, self-service portal, infrastructure automation, and financial transparency, and what gaps they are striving to close the fastest.  Throughout the blog series, I’ll be sharing results on where IT organizations are in some very specific areas such as developing cloud-native applications and application development lifecycles.  I’ll also discuss how CIOs are closing gaps in these areas.

Bookmark this series, as it’s going to be a fascinating dive into the minds of IT executives across the globe.  Check out the infographic.

Continue Reading the Series:

IT Service Strategy: Catalogs and Portals
State of IT Transformation – CIOs Want More Automation
IT Execs Plan to Reduce Software Development Release Cycle Times by 75-90%
State of IT Transformation – Solving the Operating Model Challenge
How Do You Determine if Your Legacy App is Suitable for a Public Cloud?
Be a Healthcare IT Hero….Not a Superhero……
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End User Computing Speeds Service Delivery for Health Care Providers https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/end-user-computing-speeds-service-delivery-for-health-care-providers/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/denise_partlow/end-user-computing-speeds-service-delivery-for-health-care-providers/#respond Mon, 31 Aug 2015 19:00:42 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=24414 You’ve probably seen the recent announcement from EMC on the Federation End User Computing solution. It’s another in a series of solutions, like the Federation Enterprise Hybrid Cloud, that eliminates many of the obstacles to adopting new technologies by speeding implementation and simplifying support. It also solves one of the big issues that has plagued many […]

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You’ve probably seen the recent announcement from EMC on the Federation End User Computing solution. It’s another in a series of solutions, like the Federation Enterprise Hybrid Cloud, that eliminates many of the obstacles to adopting new technologies by speeding implementation and simplifying support. It also solves one of the big issues that has plagued many people when they first tried VDI – a slow user experience.

Consider health care providers, where user flexibility and mobility is a way of life. Their users need immediate, secure, and constant access to their applications, from any device, at any time. Imagine a doctor in an emergency room trying to treat a patient. Without instant access to a patient’s medical records and history, there could be dire consequences.

eHealth Saskatchewan is a managed service provider to the entire province of Saskatchewan, Canada. Their coverage spans over one million people and is comprised of 13 different health regions. They provide doctors and nurses with access to all of their patient’s records, including medical history, birth/death certificates, immunization records, and diagnostic imaging. They depend on immediate, secure access to applications and data at any time from any device. At any point, if their technology fails, a physician may have to stop treatment. Whether that’s a scheduled surgery or an emergency room treatment, the availability of systems 24/7, 365 days a year is an absolute core requirement.

As eHealth began planning the opening of a hospital in September of this year, they turned to EMC and the Federation to design and implement an end user computing solution on a hybrid cloud to support the 6,000 simultaneous users that will be employed at the new facility. eHealth had projected that if they had used their own resources to implement a new end-user computing environment in their new facility, it would take 18 to 24 months to complete vs. the few weeks it will take for EMC to implement the new Federation End User Computing solution.

“The cloud environment allows us to grow what is essentially a private cloud for the health care environment within the province. The federation end user computing solution will allow us to standardize, allow consistent delivery, and allow consistent experience to those end users who are the medical practitioners within the province providing service directly to patients.”

                     –  ehealth Saskatchewan

With the solution, eHealth’s administrators will be able to manage desktop sessions, create new desktop pools from templates, recycle desktops, or delegate provisioning to end-users, all in one click. It also provides them with tools to help monitor end-user experience performance so that they can meet service-level agreements. These tools identify and analyze user trends, ensure consistent performance, and provide support, remediation, and troubleshooting if these expectations are not being met.

And the users will have secure, trusted access to the information they need anywhere, anytime, from any device in the hospital.

 

 

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