Frederic Dussart – InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services https://infocus.dellemc.com DELL EMC Global Services Blog Wed, 21 Feb 2018 14:18:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 Dell EMC Services Podcasts Frederic Dussart – InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services clean episodic Frederic Dussart – InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services casey.may@emc.com casey.may@emc.com (Frederic Dussart – InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services) Dell EMC Services Podcasts Frederic Dussart – InFocus Blog | Dell EMC Services /wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg https://infocus.dellemc.com Will Blockchain Disrupt the ‘Jobless’ Future? https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/will-blockchain-disrupt-the-jobless-future/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/will-blockchain-disrupt-the-jobless-future/#respond Tue, 16 Jan 2018 10:00:50 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=33481 A flurry of books and articles are raising alarm about a “jobless future.” Rapidly evolving technologies, they warn, are doing away with more than the need for human muscle and dexterity. Self-learning machines will out-think our human brains. Life-like robots will deliver care and services with a super-human patience, politeness, and efficiency. In the future, […]

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A flurry of books and articles are raising alarm about a “jobless future.” Rapidly evolving technologies, they warn, are doing away with more than the need for human muscle and dexterity. Self-learning machines will out-think our human brains. Life-like robots will deliver care and services with a super-human patience, politeness, and efficiency. In the future, therefore, no humans need apply. From baristas to surgeons, to marriage counselors—just about everyone’s job is going away, and the social, psychological, and economic impact will be devastating.

Brave New Digital World

I take a contrary view. I do not think that work will disappear. New needs will be created. There will be new ways to contribute and different things to do.

While history since the industrial revolution shows that some jobs do disappear with new technologies, overall, job loss is temporary, as new kinds of jobs are created.

False Alarmism: Technological Disruption and the U.S. Labor Market, 1850–2015

Some argue that “this time will be different” because the technological disruption goes beyond physical work to displace white collar and service jobs. While I agree that we find ourselves in a time of tremendous change, I also note that the future has a way of way of surprising us.

Unleashing a New Age of Entrepreneurship?

Blockchain, for example, could create new kinds of work by revolutionizing the way that transactions—buying, selling, trade, barter, investments, and pay for work—are conducted.

Blockchain, developed as the system of record for the Bitcoin cybercurrency, is a “distributed ledger” that maintains a transparent record of transactions across a network of unrelated computers. Data is updated by consensus in blocks linked to each other, providing a permanent, verified, end-to-end record of every transaction, shared by all users. A blockchain can be public, as with Bitcoin, or private, accessible only to particular participants. Built-in cryptography and encryption promise to address challenges of cyberfraud, identity, authentication, and privacy protection. With its transparent, documented audit trails, blockchain could also help prevent and uproot corruption.

Web of Trust

Of course, blockchain is a hot topic right now. As with other emerging technologies, it’s important to recognize both the potential—and the hype, which glosses over significant technical and practical considerations.

Nevertheless, for our purposes it’s worth pondering how a secure, rules-based platform of “cyber trust” controlled by no one entity, might affect the future of work.

From micro-loans, to trade, to services, to asset-sharing, as blockchain platforms and services evolve, they promise to empower individuals to conduct business directly with other individuals in an easy and secure way. Not only could blockchain services restore ownership over one’s individual identity and privacy and shift agency to individuals—they could enable a pure marketplace in which the determination of value for work performed shifts to individuals as well, rather than to institutions or intermediators.

Quality of Future

All of which raises the question of whether a “jobless” future might be a good thing?  Rather than fear “competition” from robots, AI, and other advances, perhaps we should envision and work for a future in which we use technology to free ourselves from the constraints of “jobs” defined by others, to focus on work that we ourselves value and want to do?

As multiple studies show, it is connection with self, family, friends and community—too often sacrificed in today’s job-based economy—that contribute to health and happiness.

Blockchain is one factor that, by minimizing the “human” risks of fraud, exploitation and distrust from our transactions with each other, could help us create a future of work that is, ultimately, more humane.

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Want to Stay Fit and Relevant in the Digital Age? Go Cloud Native. https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/want-to-stay-fit-and-relevant-in-the-digital-age-go-cloud-native/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/want-to-stay-fit-and-relevant-in-the-digital-age-go-cloud-native/#respond Mon, 20 Nov 2017 10:00:29 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=33191 Contemplating the year 2030, just a dozen or so years from now, can be head-spinning. “Realizing 2030: The Next Era of Human-Machine Partnership” makes for interesting reading on how rapidly evolving and converging technologies may impact individuals and organizations. One striking image evoked by the paper is that of humans acting like “digital resource conductors.” […]

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Contemplating the year 2030, just a dozen or so years from now, can be head-spinning. “Realizing 2030: The Next Era of Human-Machine Partnership” makes for interesting reading on how rapidly evolving and converging technologies may impact individuals and organizations.

One striking image evoked by the paper is that of humans acting like “digital resource conductors.” In my mind’s eye I see each of us with our conductor’s baton, directing holograms of useful services in 3D virtual reality to “orchestrate, manage, and automate many day-to-day activities.”

Los Angeles-based DAQRI is using AR devices to display information and work instructions over a worker’s environment, enabling them to complete a task safely and efficiently.

I like this image because I prefer a future in which humans are the “actors” rather than the “acted upon.” And I believe that by thinking and acting wisely, we can do more than position ourselves for the future, we can help to create the kind of future we want.

Fit and Relevant in the Digital Age

Recently, a large customer in APJ complained that everybody understands the threats of digital transformation—intensifying competition, disruptive technology and business models, relentless, rapid change—what’s not understood is how to “stay fit and relevant in the digital age.”

As the Realizing 2030 paper reports, a Dell Digital Transformation Index study conducted with 4,000 senior decision makers from across the world found 45 percent concerned about becoming obsolete in 3-5 years. Nearly half said they don’t know what their industry will look like in just three years’ time, and 73 percent believe they need to be more ‘digital’ to succeed in the future.

“How to stay fit and relevant in the digital age” seems a very good way of putting the challenge these leaders were describing. The phrase came back to me later, when meeting with the applications development team at a large telecommunications company in APJ. The team was laser-focused on creating a differentiating “cloud native application environment of the future.” They were applying cloud native architecture and the 12-factor app methodology for modernizing applications—and adopting a micro services architecture leveraging Pivotal Cloud Foundry and Spring and other micro service technologies on AWS for agile new cloud native application development.

Go Native

Reflecting later on how the telecom applications development team was moving ahead to create their digital future, it seemed to me that some very good advice for “staying fit and relevant in the digital age” would be to: “Go native.”

Traditionally, “go native” means to adopt the customs and way of life of the country or region where one happens to be. What I’m suggesting is that, in recognition of where we stand today, we “go digital native” and “go cloud native.”

Digital Native

No matter what industry you are in, the digital native generation (and their descendants) make up a rapidly growing proportion of your customers.

Oculus VR with Dell Precision Workstation
Students use Virtual Reality for an immersive and educational
experience.

Which means that even those of us born too soon should work to understand and begin to think like the generation that grew up in the digital world.

One thing we know about digital natives is that they are already very comfortable ‘conducting’ their lives online. Indeed, within the next three years, it’s estimated that 50 percent of the products and services that all businesses sell will be digitally enhanced.

Another thing we know about digital natives is that they are very, very quick to change their brand loyalty and buying behavior. To win and retain digital natives, you need to deliver value, speed, convenience, and innovation—not just once, but frequently and consistently.

Cloud Native

That’s why, my second piece of advice is to “go cloud native”—and as quickly as possible.

Without a cloud native application environment and agile development, you simply can’t innovate and deliver fast enough—and cost-effectively enough—to stay fit and relevant in today’s digital marketplace.

Simply put, digital innovation is the new value creation—and cloud is the way that value is delivered. For example, a leading luxury auto firm we work with here in EMEA no longer refers to themselves as an “auto manufacturer,” but as an “automotive technology company.” Other customers are similarly working to transform and re-position themselves in the marketplace as “digital technology companies.”

As Realizing 2030 puts it: “Increasing innovation in cloud-native apps and their propensity to be built and deployed in quick cadence to offer greater agility, resilience, and portability across clouds will drive further uptake. Start-ups are starting to use cloud-native approaches to disrupt traditional industries; and by 2030, cloud technologies will be embedded.”

Figure 1: Chitale Dairy launched the ‘cow to cloud’ initiative to improve the health
and well-being of cows on dairy farms in India.

For a beautiful example, take a look at how Chitale Dairy improves the economic well-being of dairy farmers in India with their ‘cow to cloud’ initiative!

I predict that within three years, 75 percent of IT spend will be driven by cloud native applications. To be able to deliver the world-class experience that digital customers demand will take the right cloud infrastructure capabilities, the right open native cloud software platform environment and the right agile and DevOps processes.

What steps are you taking to remain fit and relevant in the digital age?

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IT Transformation Maturity Curve: An APJ Services Viewpoint https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/it-transformation-maturity-curve-an-apj-services-viewpoint/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/it-transformation-maturity-curve-an-apj-services-viewpoint/#respond Mon, 07 Aug 2017 09:00:16 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=31752 Where Are You on the IT Transformation Maturity Curve? A recently published 2017 IT Transformation Maturity Curve study found that only 5% of IT organizations achieved transformation maturity. There was good news, however, for the remaining 95%. Incremental advances along the curve were shown to deliver measurable gains in agility and cost efficiencies—which, in turn, help […]

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Where Are You on the IT Transformation Maturity Curve?

A recently published 2017 IT Transformation Maturity Curve study found that only 5% of IT organizations achieved transformation maturity. There was good news, however, for the remaining 95%. Incremental advances along the curve were shown to deliver measurable gains in agility and cost efficiencies—which, in turn, help accelerate further transformation.


Here in the Asia Pacific and Japan (APJ) region, as in the rest of the world, the promises and perils of digital disruption are driving enterprises to transform their business and IT models.

In APJ, we see that all businesses are embracing Digital Transformation and IT Transformation in a more definitive way.  The driving force has been the changing business model. Customers are feeling the need to go fast or face the risk of being left behind. In some of the mature markets, such as Australia, the demand for IT Transformation services began spiking more than a year ago. Over the past year, increasing pressures to transform IT to reduce costs and fuel the innovation necessary to compete in digital markets have rippled across the region.

Dell EMC has already conducted several projects in APJ and helped our customers to realize new agility, resiliency, and cost efficiencies from successful IT Transformation projects. For example:

  • E-Konek Pilipinas, an IT service provider that delivers Software as a Service (SaaS) for the Lina Group of Companies in the logistics and transportation industry, partnered with Dell EMC to build an enterprise hybrid cloud and offer SaaS and IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) self-provisioning. Now users can more quickly and easily deploy and run new applications to meet business demands. And IT is reinvesting its OPEX savings in innovations and strategic development, such as new mobile apps and realtime analytics of field data.
  • Yamaha worked with Dell EMC consultants in Japan to consolidate 300 operational systems on a secure private cloud, which enables fast response to business demands from the company’s engineering, product development, support, finance, sales and marketing teams. Redesigned data protection provides daily (vs. monthly) backups to a remote site to maintain access to and availability of critical data and applications.

A recently published Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) research insights paper, commissioned by Dell EMC, looks at How IT Transformation Maturity Drives IT Agility, Innovation, and Improved Business Outcomes. The study surveyed a thousand global IT managers in enterprises ranging from $250 million to $20 billion in annual revenue and 1,000 – 20,000 employees—with 21% of respondents from Asia (China (10%), Japan (6%), Australia (5%). Among the APJ countries covered in the research, Japan was shown to have the greatest appetite for IT Transformation. Companies in China are picking up the pace. And the focus in Australia and New Zealand is on DevOps and agile application development.

Learning from the 5%

Based on participant responses in categories spanning data center infrastructure, process automation, and business/IT alignment, organizations, the study segments organizations into four maturity stages: Legacy, Emerging, Evolving, and Transformed.

Although the research finds wide-spread recognition that IT transformation is critical to enabling business success in the digital age, only 5% of respondents met the maturity criteria for Transformed IT.

Not surprisingly, these organizations also reported the best results across key performance indicators (KPIs), including: agility and responsiveness, cost efficiency, higher levels of funding for new projects and innovation, higher levels of internal stakeholder satisfaction, improved business outcomes, and optimism about the future.

Fortunately, there was good news for the 95% of organizations that sit elsewhere on the maturity curve: Progress through the maturity stages was extremely consistent with incremental improvements in these KPIs. The resulting gains in agility, cost efficiencies, and business satisfaction also help to accelerate further transformation.

Infrastructure Transformation Is Not Enough

Perhaps the most notable lesson that the 95% can learn from the 5% is this: Transformation is driven from the top.

CEO sponsorship and senior-level innovation and strategy officers, working across the organization, are critical. These leaders embrace the digital economy—and are willing to invest in innovation and take risks to develop a new business model. In one consumer product company, for example, the CEO directed that all new products be able to connect as part of the Internet of Things (IoT). The company’s latest products will enable users to connect with each other in a community to share tips and experiences.

Another important insight to be gained from the 5% is that infrastructure modernization, while necessary, is not sufficient. As the following slide—based on data collected from nearly 30 mature Dell EMC IT Transformation customers—shows, the return on investment from overhauling legacy infrastructure (the green “x86 Estate” segment in the bar graph) yields only 1% of the typical 18-26% savings gained. The bulk of savings comes from reducing personnel (Operating Model Transformation) and software costs (Application Transformation). Operating model transformation across people, process, and technology is necessary to gain the agility digital business demands. And agile software development and DevOps capabilities are necessary to deliver the innovation, time-to-market, and quality of customer experience it takes to compete and win in the digital economy.

ittrans

Think Like a Start Up

In APJ, as elsewhere, leaders must ‘think digital’ and cultivate a culture of innovation and urgency to ‘go fast’—or risk being left behind.

Competition from start-ups are often the impetus that drive traditional companies to transform. Just as Tesla, Uber, and self-driving initiatives are forcing traditional car makers re-examine their concept of a car, banking is being similarly disrupted by “FinTech” mobile service providers. It was Bill Gates in 1994 who made the provocative statement: “Banking is necessary, banks are not.” More recently, he mused that perhaps consumers in developed nations will someday also benefit from some of the more advanced mobile banking services that people in developing countries use.

While start-ups may not have the baggage of legacy IT to contend with, traditional companies have unique resources they can exploit, such as valuable customer data, supplier relationships, and experience. The important thing is to start—and start now—to move along the IT Transformation Maturity Curve to gain agility and cost efficiency. As companies reduce their ‘technical debt,’ they can shift resources to innovation—and accelerate ongoing transformation.

APJ Vertical Market Trends

In APJ, sectors such as business services and manufacturing are leading the way in IT Transformation, while retail, telecommunications, and banking continue to lag. Traditional telecom and retail, for example, long focused on physical infrastructure and inventory, can be unsure how or where to start to move to a software-defined model of IT. Perhaps because these industries are facing the most imminent disruption from new digital competitors, the prospect of undertaking transformative change becomes even more daunting.

Nevertheless, the drivers and the payback from software-defined IT are compelling. A very large bank, for example, recently completed an IT Transformation initiative that has reduced the time to provision from 40 days to 2 hours, enabled release of a minimally viable product (MVP) within just 3 months, and saved 30% in operational costs.

Disrupt from Within

More than anything, IT Transformation requires the ability to break away from old ways of thinking. While many organizations recognize the need to partner or hire to fill resource and skill gaps, fewer realize the value to be gained from hiring new people with very different mindsets. It’s a strategy we are currently aggressively pursuing at Dell EMC APJ. By hiring people with markedly different experience and perspectives, we hope to inject new ideas—and help disrupt from within!

Where Are You on the Curve?

See where your IT organization falls on the IT Transformation Maturity Curve with an IT Transformation Self-Assessment.

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Driving Business Value Through IT Transformation Master Class https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/driving-business-value-transformation-master-class/ https://infocus.dellemc.com/frederic_dussart/driving-business-value-transformation-master-class/#respond Thu, 16 Oct 2014 18:30:17 +0000 https://infocus.dellemc.com/?p=20683 With the global economy seeing early signs of recovery, businesses are now looking at IT to create value and become more agile to create differentiation in a highly competitive marketplace. For IT organizations, this creates a real challenge. We are dealing with the perpetual necessity to cut costs whilst balancing the need to invest in […]

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With the global economy seeing early signs of recovery, businesses are now looking at IT to create value and become more agile to create differentiation in a highly competitive marketplace.

For IT organizations, this creates a real challenge. We are dealing with the perpetual necessity to cut costs whilst balancing the need to invest in emerging technologies and innovative ways to augment the IT value chain. It seems, however, there is a simple answer: ‘Software-Defined’ with ‘No Limits’!

With VMworld Europe concluding today, you can expect a catalyst of momentum around how software is empowering IT to break down walls, demolish barriers and reveal the opportunities ahead.

To celebrate and examine this concept in more detail, the Financial Times asked EMC and VMware to record a short video series on the key elements of how to drive business value through IT Transformation. Over the next few weeks we will release a total of five videos, each addressing an area to cover when considering a transformation.  To follow the series, bookmark this blog!

Chapter One – Drivers for IT Transformation

In the first of this series of master-class videos, we explore how the convergence of cloud, big data and mobile technology is driving IT transformation across businesses.

With traditional business models being disrupted by these new technologies, senior technologists from EMC and VMware discuss why, despite pressures from the business for IT organizations to cut operational costs and address the burden of legacy IT applications and infrastructure, changing business expectations in a recovering economy are creating a phenomenal opportunity for organizations to create first mover advantage – if IT can keep pace with the business.

Coming soon:

For more insights on IT trends from senior leaders at EMC, see our Reflections Blog.

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